Come Learn to Fix Your Bike!

broken-bicycle

The Provo Bicycle Collective is hosting their second Basic Bicycle Maintenance Class of the year! Now’s a perfect time to pull your bike out of the garage and make sure it’s running before spring hits!

The details:

Basic Bicycle Maintenance Class

Thursday February 20th, 6pm

Provo Bicycle Collective: 1100 W 49 N Unit 2, Provo UT 84601

5$ gets you into the class. 2$ patch kits will also be available and hot chocolate is free!

The class will cover some of the basics, such as:

– Changing a flat
– How to lubricate a chain
– Basic brake adjustment
– Correct tire inflation tips

Check out the event on facebook or just show up!  E-mail us at provobicyclecollective@gmail.com if you have questions.

Bring your friends and we’ll see you there!

Contest! Win a year membership to the Provo Bicycle Collective!

It’s February and you’re still out on your bike, riding though inversion smog and snowstorms. The Provo Bicycle Collective salutes you!

Here’s your chance to win a year long membership to the Provo Bicycle Collective!

Get unlimited bench time at the shop! Dollar off all classes and other events!

We want to reward you for riding your bike!

PBCcontest

Here’s how you enter the contest:

Step 1:

Take a photo of you out and about with your bike.

Step 2:

Put your photo up on social media and tag the Provo Bicycle Collective.

  • Facebook Users: Like our page ‘Provo Bicycle Collective’ and tag us in your photo

  • Twitter Users: Follow us on Twitter @ProvoBicycle and tweet at us with your photo

  • Instagram Users: Follow us on Instagram, provobicyclecollective and tag us in your photo

Get your photos to us by the end of February.

We will pick the winner during the first week of March.

Basic Maintenance Class at the Provo Bicycle Collective

993815_799041673442966_346944252_n

Bring your friends to the Provo Bicycle Collective to learn the basics of bicycle maintenance on Thursday January 30th at 7pm!

The class will cover:

-Fixing a flat

-Chain care and lubrication

-Brake adjustment

-Tips on proper tire inflation

The class costs 5$ and hot chocolate will be included!

You can RSVP to the event on facebook, or just show up at the Collective’s Bike Shop located at 1100 W, 49 N, Provo UT 84601

The Provo Bicycle Collective is a non-profit volunteer run bicycle shop where mechanics teach visitors how to fix their own bicycles.  The collective also sells used bicycles and parts and are always looking for volunteers to help them organize, run events, tear down/fix up bicycles or teach classes.  They also accept donations.  Drop by during their open hours to check them out, or send them an e-mail! provobicyclecollective@gmail.com

Thursdays 1pm-7pm

Fridays 2pm-6pm

Saturdays 10am-3pm

 

See you there!

“there’s no such thing as bad weather, just bad clothing”

Those who ride their bikes through the Utah winters rely heavily on good clothing to keep them warm, safe and even comfortable through the chillier months.

Here are a few small (and mostly inexpensive) pieces of clothing that have made a big difference in my winter riding (and would make for great gifts this christmas!)

IMG_7896

 

1. base layers

Layering is the key to regulating temperature on a bicycle, and in the cold months having a warm base layer makes a huge difference.   I use a synthetic techwick base layer (both top and bottom) from EMS, and a fantastic (although expensive) wool base layer top from smartwool.  REI, Patagonia and a host of other companies make base layers, many of which are affordable (in the 35-45$ range) that will keep you both warm and dry while riding. (consider especially getting a pair of base layer bottoms.  While most people can put on an extra sweater under their jacket, putting on multiple pairs of pants makes riding a bicycle difficult, and it’s never fun to ride with cold knees!)

2. extremities

One of the most important parts of safe and comfortable cold-weather riding is keeping your fingers and toes warm.  I have yet to find the ‘perfect’ winter glove, but right now I wear a pretty warm pair from Pearl Izumi.  Lots of people opt for a half-mitten approach as well.  I sometimes also layer my hands with a cheap pair of army surplus wool gloves (5$-10$)

As far as keeping my toes warm I am completely converted to Darn Tough socks. (19$-25$) They are comfortable, wool, and amazingly, have a lifetime guarantee. IF YOU GET A HOLE IN YOUR SOCK, EVER, THEY WILL REPLACE THEM.  so amazing.  Smartwool also makes lots of great cold weather socks (I have a pair of their knee-high ski socks that are great) but I wear through the heels in a year or two.

One of the important things to remember in cold weather riding is to avoid cotton. (or as my friend’s dad used to say “if it’s not an animal of plastic, don’t wear it”) Wool and synthetics do a good job of keeping you warm even when wet, and a water resistant shell on a glove helps a lot.  Don’t even bother with those cheap cotton gloves you see in the grocery store.

3. accessories

Something to cover your neck is important in the cold, and while a scarf can work just fine, last year I got ahold of a Buff, essentially a small seamless tube of fabric and I love it.  It’s stretchy and can be used to cover your face, ears, neck, or even made into a beanie.  Also they’re affordable (20$) and come in tons of patterns and styles.

I also wear smartwool arm warmers almost every time I ride.  They keep my arms warm and cover the chilly gap between my jacket and my gloves.  They also can be removed without taking off your coat if you get too hot. (and cost only 25$!)

Lastly, make sure you wear a hat that covers your ears.  I have a wool beanie that I’ve warn for years, and under that I recently added a small bamboo cycling cap as well (bamboo may be one of the only exceptions to the “animal or plastic” rule, as it’s very good at wicking moisture) The cap is made by SWRVE and is very comfortable and light.(although i’m not seeing my particular hat on their website right now, they have lots of good products)  Make sure any hat you wear can fit under your helmet. And you may need to adjust your helmet strap to accommodate the added bulk.

 

There are many other aspects of winter riding (such as bike adjustments, jackets and panniers) that I’ll post about in the future. In the meantime, remember to ride slowly on icy streets, always ride with traffic and use a front and rear light when riding at dusk or at night!

Merry Christmas and I’ll see you on the streets!

-Spencer

 

 

Provo Road Rally on Tuesday: Show up With Signs to Show Your Support of a Bicycle & Pedestrian Friendly Provo

bikes for all

We haven’t asked for major help in a long time, but next Tuesday it is essential that we have a significant presence at the Provo City Council meeting. If you support a bicycle and pedestrian friendly city, we need your help! Now is the time to stand up and make a difference!

We are concerned about delays in the passage of the Provo Bicycle Plan (currently held up in committee and over a year past the anticipated adoption date). We also believe it is unreasonable to ask Provo residents to pay a “transportation fee” that doesn’t give consideration to all forms of transportation on our public roads. Residents will be required to pay the fee that is being discussed at Tuesday’s Provo City Council Meeting, yet the entire discussion about this fee to fund maintenance of public roads has only focused on automobiles.

We will be gathering to hold a “Road Rally” in front of the city council building on Center Street (351 W. Center Street) on Tuesday November 19th at 4:00 p.m. Please feel free to walk or bring your bicycle. We are asking Mayor Curtis and the Council to:

  • Pass the Provo Bicycle Plan as quickly as possible and pass the plan in tact without watering it down or applying unreasonable standards that are not applied to similar general plans.
  • Allocate 2% of the transportation fee funds to bicycle projects (the current mode share for bicyclists in Provo is 2.38%). Adding this to the proposed fee schedule would equal six cents a residence.

We want to have a friendly, cordial presence while showing that this is a quality of life issue that the residents of Provo care deeply about and are not giving up on. WE NEED YOU!

Please bring your friends, family, and kids and feel free to drop by even if you can only stay for a short period. Signs are particularly appreciated. Here are a few idea, but feel free to let your creative juices flow!

  • I Support Complete Streets in Provo
  • Bikes Belong on the Road Too
  • Make Streets for Everyone
  • Bicyclists and Pedestrians are Road Users Too
  • Support Safer Streets in Provo

Following the rally, we invite you to stay for the city council meeting and express your desire for a bicycle / pedestrian friendly Provo to your local elected officials during the public comment period (each speaker is allowed two minutes to speak).

The weather forecast for Tuesday is low 50s and clear. Hot cocoa will be provided! Take a look at the Facebook Event.

FAQs About the Provo Bicycle Plan

285480_2254385359645_3251958_nBy now, you’ve probably heard a lot about the Provo Bicycle Plan – a document developed over the last two years that has still not been passed. If you have questions, we have answers.

Here are some of the most commonly asked questions we get about the plan:

What is the Provo Bicycle Plan?

The Provo Bicycle Plan is a document that identifies ways the city can design complete streets; connect our existing segment of bicycle lanes; and create a safer community for bicyclists, pedestrians, and drivers. Most communities that are known for having a high quality of life have already passed similar plans. This 204 page document was carefully crafted by major stakeholders during a two year period.

Who created the Provo Bicycle Plan?

The Provo Bicycle Plan was created by a steering committee made up of representatives from all major stakeholders: Provo City Engineering, UDOT, UTA, BYU, MAG, Parks and Rec, the Provo Bicycle Committee, the city council, and Alta Planning and Design – one of the top firms in the nation. It was the work of many groups that had not come together before for something like this in Provo. The Provo Bicycle Committee had only a single seat on the steering committee that created the plan. The entities that created it were those that have the power to make things happen and determine whether or not ideas were feasible and fiscally sound.

What kind of public outreach was involved with the Provo Bicycle Plan?

Extensive public outreach took place over the last two years. Neighborhood outreach for the plan has included: A notice about the plan and avenues for input in the utilities bill sent to every residence. A website created by the consultancy firm just for the plan with a copy of the plan and multiple avenues to provide feedback from home (a feedback form, an email address, etc). A banner across University Ave. and Freedom Blvd. with a URL that led to a website with additional info. Multiple posts on the front page of the Provo city website regarding the plan / meetings. Multiple articles in The Daily Herald, The Deseret News, and The Salt Lake Tribune. A private Provo bike blog with over 400 posts and continual updates on the status of the plan.  Multiple highly publicized public meetings with maps / plan overviews and representatives from city engineering, the city council, the administration, the state, and MAG. Opportunities to provide written feedback, discuss the plan with representatives, or give oral feedback to a transcriptionist available throughout the meetings. At the Planning Commission meeting, Casey Serr from engineering noted that the turnout rate at public meetings and the response rate for online surveys was high.

Was the bicycle plan rushed?

No. The plan was supposed to be completed in less than a year (prior to December 2012). It is now approaching two years and we are missing out on opportunities to compete for funding and complete projects.

During this period, there was extensive public outreach, multiple representatives worked to iron out potential issues, and there was considerable education regarding bicycle and pedestrian friendly infrastructure provided to involved parties. During this period, the plan was extensively vetted by Provo engineering, UDOT, UTA, MAG, BYU, etc.

By comparison, Orem’s bicycle plan took 11 months from start to finish. They now qualify for funding that Provo still cannot receive. Continue reading

3rd Annual Glo-in-the-Dark Halloween Bike Ride!

Image

Join lots of costumed cyclists this Thursday at 7pm for the Provo Bicycle Collective‘s 3rd Annual Glo-in-the-Dark Halloween Bike ride!  Decorate your bike with lights and ride around Provo for about an hour, then enjoy hot chocolate and treats at the Collective’s Community Bike Shop on 1100 W 49 N.  The ride starts at University Ave and Center st and Glo-sticks will be available for a small donation. There will be prizes for best lit bicycle and best costume!  You can check out the details on facebook.

Glo-in-the-Dark Halloween Ride Poster

If you aren’t familiar with the Provo Bicycle Collective, check out our previous post.  They are entering the toughest season of the year financially and appreciate your support! All donations will go towards keeping their doors open and serving the community!

See you Thursday!

Moving By Bike in Provo

Last month Sam and I decided to move to our new apartment without the aid of motorized vehicles.  We recruited friends and wrangled together every cargo bike we could find and were able to move everything rather easily.  We should have found someone to take more pictures and film footage, but everyone was busy lifting and riding, so you’re stuck watching the few amateur videos I took.  I hope you enjoy it, and remember that everything is better on a bike!

-Spencer

Bike Camping: You can do it!

It’s summer time! Just think of the biking activities that you can do. If you haven’t tried bike camping before, this is the year to do it. All you need is your loyal bicycle with a sturdy rear and/or front rack and some camping essentials.

Here is a video that will give you some tips for bike touring, but we used it to help us plan for our bike camping trip.:

 

As always, pack according to your needs and know that it is possible.

Just check out these savvy bike campers.

Photo courtesy of Jordan Englund

Photo courtesy of Jordan Englund

Photo courtesy of Jordan Englund

Photo courtesy of Jordan Englund

 

Ride safe. Enjoy the sun.

 

googlec90d6ba62320f451