Looking for BYU Students who Cycle on Bulldog Boulevard

As you are probably aware, the Bulldog project, which will improve safety for all users on this important corridor, is slated to be completed next spring. Yesterday the Campus Bicycle Committee participated in a meeting between Provo City Public Works and BYU’s Physical Facilities about how to make sure there is a safe and seamless transition across Canyon Road and onto campus. To do that will probably require BYU to widen the road slightly at the entrance to campus at 1230 North.

The administration has asked our committee to gather some bike usage data and we agreed that complementing that with some anecdotal evidence, specifically student voices sharing their experiences riding on Bulldog and up 1230 North would help us better make the case to the BYU Campus Planning Committee.

Could you please by next Monday share a paragraph or two about your experience as a bicyclist on Bulldog and 1230 North? (Did you, for example, feel safe riding on the shoulder began before the bike lane began near the entrance to the RB?) Also, if you know of any other students or former students who took that route, despite how dangerous it is, could you please ask them to share their experiences with me by next Monday?

BTW, some opposition to the project has emerged within Provo among those who can’t countenance the thought of an auto lane becoming a protected bike lane so if you could please complete this four-question, one-minute city survey I’d be very appreciative. (Please use your Provo address and please share with others.)

Many thanks,

Aaron Skabelund
Associate Professor
Department of History
Brigham Young University

Advocacy Alert: Provo Needs Your Voice!

Bulldog Boulevard and 500 West Redesigns

Provo is considering plans for Bulldog Boulevard and 500 West that are designed to slow car traffic and add bike lanes.

Sadly, many residents intend to keep these streets the high-speed, wide-open roads they currently are. This would maintain the high level of traffic crashes–more than seven times the state average–and continue to discourage cycling along those routes. These people have already blasted the city government with messaging in opposition of the project.

We need your voice now to encourage our city government to install bicycle-friendly infrastructure so all road users can be safe.

Here’s what you can do:

  1. Public Comment on Bulldog Boulevard: Provo City and UDOT want to hear your thoughts on the initial project design. Submit comments to the project team. Contact 888-966-6624 or provobulldogblvd@gmail.com.
  2. Online Comment on Bulldog Boulevard: Follow the link to comment on the proposed design.
  3. 500 West Design Open House: June 13 from 5-7pm at the Provo Recreation Center. Learn more about the project design.
  4. Contact your city council representative and voice your support for bicycle-friendly roads. Call (801) 852-6000 or email Council@provo.org

2018 National Bike Summit

This is report on the 2018 National Bike Summit by Elias Flores, who participating in the gathering in early March. My apologies for the delay in posting his report. -Aaron Skabelund

“The National Bike Summit sponsored by the League of American Bicyclists was fascinating. The summit took place in Washington D.C., which is surprisingly bicycle and pedestrian friendly. The capital’s investments in bike-share, bike lanes, and a trail system are paying off. Not only does the district have the second-highest percentage of bike commuters among major U.S. cities, it was awarded gold status as one of the most bike-friendly cities in the country. The summit featured presentations and workshops about how to make communities more bicycle friendly. I had the opportunity to participate in a mobile workshop on how a large regional university–the University of Maryland in College Park–partnered with city and county partners to establish a bike share system that is open to everyone and is connected to all major destinations. Establishing such a system was not easy. Multiple agencies and organizations wanted their voices to be heard. From this case study, I learned how a travel demand management tool can be implemented in a regional area that spans several different jurisdictions. About 2,500 trips a day are now completed at the university and in the city of College Park. Provo is an ideal place for bike share to be implemented. Doing so will improve our community’s quality of life.”

Bike Racks Make it Convenient to Ride Daily

It’s about 8 am. I walk outside and hop on my bike to head to work. There’s a few kids on bikes headed toward school along with a few adults going to school too. There’s a few others that are on their way to work, like me. Refreshed from my commute to and from work, I roll in to the condominium complex around 5:15 pm. I see some other people coming back from work or school and tons of kids out on bikes. What I don’t see are bike racks. Instead bikes are being locked to trees, stairwells, and light posts or they sit on the grass. You find them on balconies and in stairwells, which makes it inconvenience and difficult to use them daily. We need bike racks!

After working with the HOA board and the management company, we were able to have two bike racks installed at my complex. Don’t let their emptiness fool you. You see, everyone’s out cycling, but by dark the racks don’t seem so lonely.

-Ben McMurry

Impressions of the 2018 Utah Bike Summit

Provo was represented at annual Utah Bike Summit by nearly twenty people who live and/or work in Provo. The contingent rivaled the number of attendees even when the summit was held at the Provo Library back in 2015. Provo attendees included neighborhood chairs, city officials, public health experts, BYU representatives and BYU students, and local tourism officials.

This year’s summit was held at the Utah Cultural Celebration Center in West Valley City on Tuesday, March 13. Many of the Provo participants took Frontrunner to the Murray Station and then enjoyed a lovely ride on the Jordan River Pathway to the venue.

The conference featured keynote speaker, Guillermo Penalosa, the former Commissioner of Parks, Sports and Recreation in Bogotá and chair of 8 80 Cities that is dedicated to simple but powerful philosophy; if you create a great city for an 8 year old and an 80 year old, you will create a successful city for all people. In addition, officials from regional UDOT offices presented and took questions, and panels explored advocacy, planning & engineering, and health in three sessions of simultaneous presentations. In one of those, committee member and Timp Neighborhood Chair Shannon Bingham and Provo City traffic engineers Jared Penrod and Shane Winters presented on the 500 North active transportation project.

Here are some impressions of some of the Provo attendees:

“Hearing Gil Penalosa speak about healthy, vibrant, and sustainable communities for everyone regardless of age, gender, or social status [was great]. His focus on the design and use of parks and streets as great public places, as well as sustainable mobility: walking, riding bicycles, taking public transit, and new uses of cars was the highlight of the summit for me.”

-Shannon Bingham, Timp Neighborhood Chair

“I went to the bike summit expecting to hear about many of the small details of cycling in Utah. I was so pleasantly surprised when most speakers focused on the broad social impacts that increased cycling can have in Utah. You did not have to be an engineer or planner to understand just how important all of this is.”

-Hayden Andersen, BYU Engineering Student

​”How would you feel walking your city’s streets as an 8 year-old? My biggest takeaway was the 8/80 Rule; the idea that a city should feel as comfortable as an 8 or 80 year-old as it does for a 30 year-old. We must ensure our cities are designed with these groups in mind.​”

-Austin Taylor, Director, Provo Bicycle Collective

“I attended the Bike Summit as a member of the Provo Bike Committee and also as a City Planner with Orem City. It was great opportunity to sit down with bike advocates from across the state and hear about the latest progress on multi-modal infrastructure. In addition, I was particularly inspired by the perspective and energy of Gil Penalosa. He emphasized that roughly 1/3 of our population in the US does not drive, and that when we design cities for the vehicle we in affect design to greatly exclude these members of our society–the young, the old, and the poor.”

-Kirby Snideman, North Park Neighborhood Chair

“I was more pleased and impressed with the process of attending the Bike Summit. The sessions and speakers were very informative and there are great things happening to facilitate active transportation across Utah. However, the experience of commuting from Provo to West Valley City on bike via surface streets, Front Runner, taking the Jordan River Parkway Trail, and the bike valet service at event really opened my eyes to the kinds of routes and amenities that make bicycling accessible, practical and convenient. Taking a bike instead of a car gave added perspective to the topics and appreciation for the presentations. For [many of my fellow Provo participants] it was no big deal to take your bike, but as a new convert, it helped me understand the reality and importance of a different way of being mobile.”

-John Kau, Chair, BYU Campus Bicycle Committee

“I loved the concept of building cities for 8 year olds and 80 year olds. A community safe and comfortable for people of those ages would be radically different environments, positively so, for all inhabitants. Imagine not having to worry about  your daughter or grandmother making their way across the city. Brilliant vision!”

-Hugh Van Wagenen, Joaquin resident and Lindon City Planner

“Once again, learning from people all across the state, the country, and the world about how make Provo an even better place to live by better accommodating and making safe all modes of transportation was invigorating. And it was great not only to think about these principles but to act on them as many of us rode through the streets of Provo, took Frontrunner, and the Jordan River Trail to get to the summit. Thanks to Bike Utah for hosting another great summit.”

-Aaron Skabelund, Rivergrove Neighborhood Co-chair

 

 

 

Provo Bike Month 2018

From the mayor’s blog:

Provo Bike Month!

Save the date! May is National Bike Month and Provo will be celebrating the many benefits of bicycling! Whether you bike to work or school, ride to save money or time, pump those pedals to preserve your health or the environment, or simply to explore your community – you’re going to love the events and activities we’ve got planned. We’ve put together a month full of events and activities to celebrate the unique power of the bicycle and the many reasons we ride!

Tuesday, May 1 | 7:30-9:00 am Breakfast Stations hosted by employers, large & small, across the city
 
Provo businesses will host stations located throughout the city and hand out free breakfast, drinks, and other treats to people who arrive by bike from 7:30 – 9:00 am. (Provo City’s breakfast station will be open at 6:30 am for early bird riders.) Pick up some breakfast, get to know your fellow commuters, have your bike looked at by a pro mechanic, and connect with the Provo Bike Committee and other community volunteers. To stay up to date on event details, RSVP to the Facebook Event Page.
 
Get-Yourself-a-Bike Sale
May 1-5, Provo Bicycle Collective
 
You want to participate in Bike Month, but you don’t have a bike or maybe not the bike you want. Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered! Provo Bicycle Collective is lowering its already-low prices store-wide. EVERYTHING in the shop is 10% off from Tuesday, May 1 through Saturday, May 5. Come get yourself a bike, bell, basket, bag, or anything else! It doesn’t even have to start with the letter “B”! Refurbished adult bikes generally range from $100-$350 and kids’ bikes range from $30-150. To stay up to date on event details, RSVP to the Facebook Event Page.
 
Free Bike Maintenance Class
Wednesday, May 2 | 7:00 pm
Provo Bicycle Collective
 
A good bike is an investment that will last decades if properly maintained. But how do you maintain your bike?
Join us for a no-nonsense presentation about the essentials of basic bike maintenance taught by PBC’s senior bike mechanic and shop operations manager Ikaika Cox. You’ll walk away knowing how to keep your bike running reliably all year. To stay up to date on event details, RSVP to the Facebook Event Page.
 
Bike Art Stroll
Friday, May 4 | 6:00 – 9:00 pm
Downtown Provo at Participating Businesses
 
Grab your bike and pedal on over for Downtown Provo’s May Art Stroll on Saturday, May 4 from 6-9 pm. Enjoy the good weather, good art, good music, and good company! There will be a variety of art galleries participating. Be sure to look for the “Gallery Open” signs in front of each participating gallery as you stroll downtown. You can pick up an event map at any of the locations.
 
Social Bike Rides
Wednesday, May 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 | 8:00 pm
Provo Bicycle Collective
 
No racing, no spandex, just a good-old ride around the city.
Join PBC staff as we ride through Provo and explore places you may have never been. The ride will be different each night, so join us for all of them. All ages and abilities welcome. Don’t forget your bike lights! To stay up to date on event details, RSVP to the Facebook Event Page.
 
Women’s Night Open House
Monday, May 7 | 4:00 – 7:00 pm
Provo Bicycle Collective
 
Bicycle maintenance has traditionally been an overwhelmingly male-dominated trade. Let’s change that!
Join your female-community on Monday, May 7 for a Women’s Night Open House to eat snacks, weld friendships, and check out the shop to see what we do on Women’s Volunteer Nights! Drop in anytime between 4 and 7pm. To stay up to date on event details, RSVP to the Facebook Event Page.
 
Bike Theft Prevention Class
Wednesday, May 9 | 7:00 pm
Provo Bicycle Collective
 
About 1,000 bikes are stolen each year in Provo. Will yours be next?
Join PBC location director Austin Taylor as we discuss how to keep your bike safe and recover it if stolen. Bike locks will be 10% off that night. To stay up to date on event details, RSVP to the Facebook Event Page.
 
Overnight Bike Trip to Nunn’s Park
Friday, May 11 @ 6:00 pm to Saturday, May 12 @ 10am
Provo Bicycle Collective
 
Get out of the city and into the mountains by pedal power. Join PBC staff as we cruise the Provo River Trail up to Nunn’s Park to camp. Bring your loved ones or meet some new friends around the campfire! All ages are welcome.
Registration fee includes camping fee, campfire wood, and s’mores. Campers will need to bring their own sleeping arrangements (hammock, tent, sleeping bag, etc.), food, water, and some warm clothing for the night. If you do not have racks or bags to carry your gear on your bike, we’ll have a bike trailer that can carry up to 100lbs of gear and will happily shuttle your stuff. 
 
CycloFemme Ride
Saturday, May 12 | 1:00 pm
Provo Bicycle Collective
 
CycloFemme is a Global Celebration of Women created TO HONOR THE PAST from the shoulders of those who stood before us, for the freedom to choose and the chance to wear pants. TO CELEBRATE THE PRESENT with strength and courage, voices raised, moving together. TO EMPOWER THE FUTURE of women everywhere, the backbone of positive social change. Join PBC program manager Kira Johnson for a fun, casual ride around the city for women of all ages and abilities. To stay up to date on event details, RSVP to the Facebook Event Page.
 
Worldwide Ride of Silence
Wednesday, May 16 | Meet @ 6:30 pm, Ride starts @ 7:00 pm Dixon Middle School (750 W 200 N)
 
Join the Provo chapter of the Worldwide Ride of Silence on May 16th to ride to honor people who were killed or injured while biking this last year and last several years. We will begin at Dixon Middle School and go for a short, slow, silent ride with brief stops at the ghost bike memorials for Doug Crow and Mark Robinson, and return to Dixon Middle School where we will have light refreshments.
 
Bike-in Movie
Friday, May 18 | 9:00 pm
Provo Bicycle Collective
 
Think of it as a drive-in movie without the tailpipe emissions.
Join us at the shop for a movie night featuring “Rising from Ashes”, a film about Rwandans who used the bicycle to recover from genocide. Bring the whole family and snacks to share! To stay up to date on event details, RSVP to the Facebook Event Page.
 
Free Bicycle Safety Check and Demo
Saturday, May 19 | | 8:00 am – 12:00 pm
Riverview Park
 
As part of our initiative to support our community, Mad Dog Cycles will be partnering with Provo City and the Utah County Health Department to do a series of Bicycle and Helmet safety check events. Bring your Bicycle and Helmet to Riverview Park between 8am and Noon on May 19th for a FREE safety check (a $25 value in-store). We will also have the latest and greatest in bicycle technology with us for you to test ride. New pedal assist, Mountain and Road bikes will be on hand for FREE test rides. To stay up to date on event details, RSVP to the Facebook Event Page.
 
Pedal Provo Ghost Tour
Saturday, May 19 | 9:00 pm
Provo City Cemetery
 
Pedal Provo Ghost Tour is holding a very special tour in celebration of Provo Bike Month! Tickets are required to come on this ride so please visit their website: https://pedalprovo.com/provo-bike-month-ghost-tour for more info and to claim your spot!
 
7th Annual FFUFR Forest Race
Friday, May 25 | 7:00 pm
Paul Ream Wilderness Park
 
FFUFR stands for Fun, Fun Underground Forest Race. Yes, it’s that fun.
Join us for a ridiculous race through the forest and streams at Paul Ream Wilderness Park. Bikes will be provided. Please bring your helmet and a side to share for the BBQ! All ages and abilities are welcome, racing is not required; you can just watch if you’d like! To stay up to date on event details, RSVP to the Facebook Event Page.
 
Bikes & Trikes Festival
Saturday, May 26 | 11:00 am – 1:00 pm
Memorial Park
 
Grab your family, friends, and neighbors and pedal on over to Memorial Park (800 E Center St) on Saturday, May 26th from 11:00 am – 1:00 pm. You’ll want to bring your bikes, trikes and training wheels for some fun cycling festivities your whole family will enjoy! To stay up to date on event details, RSVP to the Facebook Event Page.

Provo Bicycle Collective Gives Free Bikes to 53 Children

From BicycleCollective.org:

“On Saturday, March 24th, dozens of children lined up to receive a free bicycle from Provo Bicycle Collective.

Within one hour, PBC had given all 53 bikes to children for free.

Our hope is that each bike recipient uses his or her bike to get to school each day and continues that habit into adulthood. This way, we can reduce traffic, clean Utah’s air, and create a healthier population.

We need your support in this cause!

Donate money or bikes today. $30 provides a bike for a child in need! Please give today!

2018’s Golden Spoke Winter Bicycle Commuter Award Goes to …

At the City Council on January 23rd, Committee member Rachel Whipple presented Colby Sanford with this year’s Winter Commuter Award.

Here is Rachel’s recognition of Colby.

“For the past seven years, the Provo Bicycle Committee has been recognizing outstanding
bicycle commuters for their contribution to Provo by awarding the Golden Spoke Award.

We believe in cycling as an effective and sustainable form of transportation that can help create
a cleaner, healthier, and safer society. It has the advantage of being fun, too.

Several years ago, I received the Golden Spoke for giving up our family car during Lent and
blogging about my experiences cycling and walking. So I am happy to be able to pass this
award on to another person who bicycles.

Three years ago, we began recognizing winter bicycle commuters with the help of Canyon–now
Hangar 15–Bicycles, which generously sponsors the winter award.

In an action unanimously approved by the Committee, I am pleased to award Colby Sanford
as the recipient of the 2018 Golden Spoke Winter Bicycle Commuter Award.

This winter, Colby has been documenting his bicycle commute, taking pictures of his bike, and sending them to his friend, Chris Wiltsie, the newly elected chair of the bike committee. Colby’s bicycle commute from his home in the Maeser Neighborhood to BYU started out of necessity, but has became intrinsically valuable for him. Although this story began as private exchange of photos and encouragement between these two that strengthened their friendship, the consistency and example of Colby cycling, in all sorts of weather and the documentation of it, are making an important contribution to bicycling in Provo. 
Colby is a university student, like many Provo residents, and an artist. In the latter capacity, he
is very active in the Provo art scene and contributes to the eclectic vibrance of our community.
The Provo Bicycle Committee would like to thank Colby for showing all of us that it is possible to bicycle commute in winter, even when it snows.”