Provo Bicycle Committee Reorganized

At the Committee’s first meeting of 2018 on January 4, we reorganized the structure and elected and appointed new leadership. The most impressive ingredient of the meeting was the energy and enthusiasm. We may have had a record turn-out with no fewer than 27 attendees.

Based on the charter we adopted late last year, we elected Chris Wiltsie as the new chair and Christina Catron as secretary with Rachel Whipple as assistant secretary. Equally as important, over twenty members of the committee agreed to act as coordinators for three different kinds of projects: bikeways, events and special, and other initiatives.

Here is a list of project coordinator appointments.  If you would like to know more about or help out with a particular project, please contact the coordinator. If you are interested in serving in some capacity, please let us know.

bikeway projects

  •      Bulldog/1230 North (protected bike lanes): Aaron Skabelund
  •      BRT-related lanes and College Connector Trail: Chris Blinzinger
  •      (North) 500 West: David Harding, Shannon Bingham, Kirby Snideman, Aaron
  •      (South) 500 W (bike lanes south of I-15): Becky Hunt
  •      500 N (pedestrian issues, extension to University in 2018): Shannon Bingham
  •      Canyon Road (bike lanes in Edgemont): Stuart Withers
  •      200 E (neighborhood bikeway): Josh Cordon, Celeste Kennard, Hugh Van Wagenen
  •      800 E/450 N (neighborhood bikeway): Wayne Leavitt
  •      Tree Streets (bike route): Jamin Rowan
  •      Provo River Trail improvements: Eric Chase
  •      Dirt trails (Slate Canyon/Bonneville Shoreline Trail):
  •      Others:

events and special projects

  •      Representative to mayor’s budget review committee: Christina Catron
  •      Active Transportation Pilot: Heather Skabelund, Miles Miller
  •      Bikeway Tour (spring ride for city officials): Ted Lyon, Grant Skabelund
  •      Bike to School Week (September): Rachel Whipple
  •      Bike Month (working with Whitney Booth): Ben Mcmurry, Aaron, Austin Taylor
  •      Ride of Silence (May): Lucy Ordaz
  •      Bike map (working with City’s Phil Uhl): Sabrina Huyett, Stuart Withers
  •      Wayfinding (working with City’s Matt Taylor): Shauna Mecham, Kira Johnson, Daniel Jensen
  •      Bikeshare (working with City’s Chad Thomas): Naomi Lemoyne, Stuart Withers
  •     Golden Spoke (Winter and Summer) Bicycle Commuter Award:
  •     Freedom Festival parade:
  •     Provo Birthday Historic Homes Ride (March):
  •     Other events and special projects:

other Initiatives

  •   bikeprovo: Jamie Littlefield
  •   public relations: Austin Taylor, Kira Johnson
  •   committee traffic engineering consultant: Clancy Black
  •   committee planning consultant: Hugh Van Wagenen
  •   education: Elias Flores and Kai Cox
  •   walkability: Tinesha Zandemela, Susan Krueger-Barber
  •   bike parking: Mary Wade
  •   Bicycle Friendly Business outreach:
  •   Transportation & Mobility Advisory Committee: Grant Skabelund (will apply)
  •   Sustainability Committee: Sabrina Huyett
  •   Transit: Jacob Johnson
  •   Safe Routes to School
  •   Other initiatives:

We are confident that the committee’s new leadership and organization will help us accelerate the momentum we have to make Provo even more bicycle and pedestrian friendly.

Provo Bicycle Committee Charter

Here is the charter the committee adopted in late 2017 that went into effect beginning in 2018.

Provo Bicycle Committee

We are group of volunteers seeking to make bicycling an everyday part of people’s lives in our community. Recognized as the Mayor’s Provo Bicycle Committee, we work closely with representatives of city departments to accomplish this objective.

PURPOSE

The purpose of the Provo Bicycle Committee is to advance the creation of infrastructure, programs, events, and performance evaluation across Provo that enable and encourage residents of all ages and abilities to get around safely using active transportation modes (primarily bicycling and walking), as well as mass transit.

PROJECTS

This purpose will be pursued through the development and implementation of action-oriented projects that encourage local governments to increase and improve conditions for active transportation. Projects are primarily driven by needs identified by group members and may include working with resident stakeholders and reaching out to partner organizations, meetings with officials, and other coalition building exercises. The group will also monitor upcoming opportunities within Provo such as city, state, and UTA initiatives. Projects that lead to widespread citizen engagement and use tactical urbanism as a tool for effecting change are encouraged.

MEETINGS

Regular monthly meetings will be held the first Thursday of the month from 5-6 pm. (Currently we meet in the Community Development second floor conference room at 330 W. 100 S.)

At each meeting, we will have a brief handout on active projects so new participants can fit their energy into existing efforts. If members would like information about their project included, they need to send a one-paragraph update by the Monday prior to the meeting. Include a brief overview of the project, its current status, and where support is needed.

OFFICERS

Each officer shall

  • Serve a two- to three-year term or until their successors are elected
  • Be elected by majority vote via ballot by those present
  • Not serve more than two consecutive terms in the same office

Chair/Co-Chairs – Responsible for facilitating meetings and keeping the group on task

Secretary – Responsible for taking meeting minutes

Project Coordinators – Responsible for supporting campaigns, including posting petitions and updating information on the website and/or BikeProvo.org

GROUP RULES

In order to ensure this group is making positive steps forward, we have set some basic rules for how the group and meetings will operate:

Be inclusive – We want more people in Provo to be able to bike and walk safely, and to use mass transit. The more people and partners working to make this a reality, the more quickly and effectively this future can be realized.

No complaining – This group is action- and solution-oriented. You probably came to the Provo Bicycle Committee regarding a lack of infrastructure, a safety concern, or some other issue related to bicycling and/or walking. Let’s determine what the problem is, identify a solution, create a plan, and get to work.

No acronyms – In order to be inclusive, we strive to use language that supports mutual understanding between all group members and those who attend meetings.

You are responsible for the fate of your project – If you are the lead on a project, your own effort will largely dictate its success or failure. People in the group are willing to support you with expertise, connections, and strategy, but you must take ownership of your campaign.

Make a plan – A goal without a plan is just a wish. Developing a plan will allow more people to rally around your cause and increase the likelihood of your campaign’s success. A sample plan can be found in the Transportation Alternatives Activist Guide on pages 22 and 23.

Work gets done between meetings – Most of what will get accomplished will take place outside of the scheduled meetings. Time in the meetings is reserved for short updates, requests for support/guidance, and presentation of new projects. Always leave meetings with a strategy or next steps for moving your project forward.

Healthy Tension – We strive for a healthy tension with all of our projects and our work in general. This type of approach ensures that we push local communities to improve active transportation while maintaining positive relationships and fostering mutual benefit. We practice persistence and patience.

Top 5 Situations to Avoid When Cycling

Cycling is one of the safest ways to get from A to B. Not only do you reduce your environmental footprint, but it’s also a great form of exercise. Unfortunately, even the safest cyclist could be involved in a crash.  There’s no way to prevent a careless motorist, but there are some techniques you can utilize to reduce your chances of getting involved in a crash.

Situation #1: Getting Doored

This is one of the most dangerous situations for any cyclist, as there is very little time to react quickly enough to get out of the way of the motorist, and if you do swerve out of the way of a door, you may go into oncoming traffic. How can you avoid this?

You must ride at least 4’ away from any parked cars that you think may be opening their doors. If you can touch the car’s mirror, you’re too close. Obvious culprits include a line of parked cars and taxis, but you should also be cautious around any cars parked in the middle of the street with their hazards on. It’s likely they’re stopping to pick up or drop off a passenger.

Don’t be tempted to ring your bike’s bell when approaching cars. It does nothing. If a motorist hears it (they won’t), they still won’t realize that you’re behind the car in time. Fortunately, the law is on your site: In nearly every state, motorists have an obligation to check to make sure the coast is clear before opening their car doors. If you break a bone due to their carelessness, it’ll be paid for by their insurance.

Situation #2: Busses & Trucks

This isn’t a situation per se, but it’s something to look out for.  So, what can you do to avoid an incident with a bus? Never ride to the right of busses. They often pull to the side and make stops, so it’s easy for you to be sideswiped or forced onto the sidewalk, if you’re lucky.

Trucks and busses also have the issue of blind spots: They won’t see you approaching from the side as a motorist would. Finally: It’s not like our odds are great against cars, but a mash-up between a cyclist and a truck is even worse. Give them their space and stay far behind them to stay out of their blind spot.

Situation #3: The Left Cross

This collision occurs when you’re riding straight and a car turns left at an intersection. A cyclist is significantly smaller than a car, so motorists may not be as apt to see you as they would another vehicle. There are a few ways you can make yourself more visible to motorists so they won’t turn into you:

Dress appropriately and have the required reflectors and headlights on your bicycle at the very least. You can also add reflective stickers and decals to your helmet, which you should wear at all times!

Don’t pass anyone on the right. If you’re to the right of a car, another vehicle turning left will have no hope of seeing you.

Situation #4: Pedestrians

Much like trucks or busses, this is not a “situation,” itself, but pedestrians can cause a lot of trouble, especially if you live in a busy city. My commute home from work involves passing around 5,000 people, all trying to get to the major train station in the city. Pedestrians will peek out around a parked car, see there’s no other cars approaching, and step directly in front of me.

You should ride in the center of your lane whenever you’re in an area with heavy foot traffic. This way, if they “peek out” in front of cars, you won’t crash into them. If you do see someone stroll in front of you: Bells are a solid idea, and investing in a loud bell (such as a SpurCycle) may help you get your point across.

Situation #5: Potholes and Loose Gravel

As dangerous as motorists are, many crashes are caused by poor terrain or simply falling off your bike. Be sure to take note of your environment as you ride, which includes the ground as well as the other cars. Only ride roads you know well at night if you can, as it’ll be much harder to navigate. Finally, and it seems obvious, but you should only ride at a speed that’s safe for your ability. It’s possible to stay loose and ride through a monster pothole, but only if you’re riding at a safe speed.

A wealth of information, tips, and videos related to Smart Cycling can be found on the Ride Smart page on the League of American Bicyclists’ website.

 

This article was provided by www.personalinjury-law.com, an organization dedicated to providing the public with information about personal injury and safety information. Nothing in this article should be construed as legal advice, and it is intended for informational use only. Be sure to review your local cycling ordinances to ensure you ride safe and legally.

The Provo Bicycle Community Welcomes Mayor Michelle Kaufusi

We’re starting off the new year by welcoming Provo’s new mayor, Michelle Kaufusi.

Last month (despite being extraordinarily busy after taking office early) Mayor Kaufusi took the time to sit down with representatives of the Provo Bicycle Committee. We’re delighted to report that she invited us to continue our role as the mayor’s official committee.

Mayor Kaufusi was particularly interested in listening to our stories and finding ways that she could best help Provo become a safer, more welcoming place to ride a bicycle or walk.

A few weeks later, we were tickled when one of the new mayor’s first videos featured her taking the lane on two wheels…

When Mayor Curtis first took office eight years ago, bicycling was almost never mentioned. Now, it’s taken seriously in Provo and throughout the state as a way to encourage quality of life, improve our air, and create great neighborhoods for our families. Mayor Curtis took bicycling into the Provo mainstream, and we have high hopes that Mayor Kaufusi will be able to make Provo one of the best cities for cycling in the West!

Welcome, Mayor Kaufusi!

Dear Mayor Curtis: We Remember

Dear Mayor Curtis,

Thank you for your (almost magical) advocacy for Provo residents who walk and ride bicycles in the city.

Eight years ago, a small group approached you and asked if they could work towards making Provo more bicycle-friendly. You invited us to become the mayor’s Provo Bicycle Committee.

Since then, you’ve worked in public and in private to make our streets safer for all road users, including kids headed to school, bicycle commuters, moms pushing strollers, and BYU students.

As you’re headed to Washington, we just wanted to let you know one thing. We remember.

Remember when you made it a priority to understand our concerns by riding your bicycle to work on Provo’s streets for 100 days in a year? We remember.

Remember when state agencies told us there was no way of getting bike lanes on University Ave? But, just before the project was finalized, the lanes showed up in the plan anyway? We remember.

Remember when you were willing to stand up (in spite of push-back) for trying new things? Like the city’s first bicycle-friendly intersection or the buffered bicycle lanes soon coming to Bulldog Boulevard? We remember.

Remember when your family rode a bicycle in the Independence Day Parade and invited community cyclists to join in the fun? We remember. 

Remember when you hosted Bike-to-School Week, Clear-the-Air Challenges, and all of the Bike-to-Work Weeks. We remember.

Remember when you always heard us out, even when we weren’t the most patient? We remember.

Remember when you took a Taco Crawl throughout downtown on a tandem? We remember.

Remember all the little and big risks you took to make streets safer for all of us? We won’t forget. 

Thank you, Mayor Curtis.

Sincerely,

So many families, students, children, seniors, and people who enjoy Provo’s streets.

UDOT Opens Active Transportation Safety Manager Position

From Bike Utah:

“UDOT recently opened this position that is primarily focused on Safe Routes to School, SNAP, and bicycle and pedestrian safety. If you know of anyone who would be a great fit for this position, please send it along to them. This is one of only four statewide people in Utah focused on AT so a great person in this position would be a huge help in moving things forward more quickly. Please share the posting. Deadline is January 3rd.”

Check out the description and apply here.

Utah Valley Hospital Encourages its Employees to Embrace Two Wheels

by Michelle Best, Regional Manager, Health Promotion & Wellness, Utah Valley Hospital

 

With a mission of “helping people live the healthiest lives possible,” Utah Valley Hospital has plenty of reasons to encourage caregivers (hospital employees) to embrace two wheels instead of four. During the summer of 2016, the hospital was designated as a bronze-level Bicycle Friendly Business by the League of American Bicyclists in recognition for its work to get more caregivers on bicycles. Here are some of the ways the hospital is promoting cycling:

Participating in Provo’s Bike to Work Day

The hospital hosted a breakfast station on 800 North as part of Provo’s Bike to Work Day in May 2017, and more than 55 cyclists from around the community showed up. The secret? Breakfast burritos! The hospital plans to host a breakfast station next year, and Intermountain Healthcare will be promoting National Bike to Work Month in May 2018.

Sponsoring a Cycling Club

In 2014, Utah Valley Hospital, in partnership with Intermountain Cancer Centers and the American Fork Canyon Run Against Cancer, started sponsoring veloLOVE Cycling Club. The club’s purpose is to promote physical activity through cycling by getting as many people on bikes as possible. Through the sponsorship, the club provides highly discounted kits, organizes weekly club rides for cyclists of all abilities, and participates in cycling events. In 2017, club members rode in events like LOTOJA (Logan to Jackson), the Cache Gran Fondo, FrontRunner Century, Leadville Trail 100 MTB, and Crusher in the Tushar. To join veloLOVE, you can sign up for the club’s email list at www.velolove.club.

Cycling Clinics

For the past two years, American Fork Hospital has hosted a free cycling clinic every spring. The clinic provides information about sports nutrition, bicycle maintenance, injury prevention, training, and bike fits.

Utah Valley Hospital Campus Plan & Bicycle Parking

When Utah Valley’s hospital replacement project is complete in 2019, there will be a bike path running east to west from the hospital’s main entrance to 940 North. This will provide convenient front door access to the facility. The hospital recently purchased 15 Cycle Docks and 12 double bike lockers to place near key hospital access points for caregivers, volunteers, and hospital visitors. By making bike parking more convenient than parking a car and by putting it in highly visible locations, the hospital hopes that more caregivers will begin commuting by bicycle to work. The hospital will also provide a repair station and bicycle pump on the north and south end of campus.

Spin Classes

To help caregivers stay active, particularly during the winter months, the new LiVe Well Center at Utah Valley Hospital (opening 2018) will feature free spin classes. The American Fork Hospital Wellness Center also provides free winter spin classes for caregivers and has started supporting off-season youth mountain bike training.

Incentives for Biking to Work

Intermountain Healthcare’s LiVe Well incentive program allows caregivers to earn $50 per quarter by completing a wellness activity of their choice and watching two online wellness modules. Caregivers can bike to work for their wellness activity.

Utah Valley Hospital hopes to continue finding ways to encourage caregivers and visitors to ride their bikes to the hospital. With bicycle lanes coming in 2018 to Bulldog Boulevard (protected), 500 West (buffered), which both border the hospital campus, UVH will have bike lanes on all four sides of the campus (with the lanes on 800 North and University Avenue), making cycling safer and more convenient.

BYU Police Form Partnership with Provo Bicycle Collective

From BicycleCollective.org:

“Provo Bicycle Collective is proud to announce a newly-formed partnership with BYU police who will now donate bikes abandoned on BYU campus.  BYU Police joins Provo and Springville police departments in donating abandoned bikes to charity.

Each semester, between 200-300 bikes are bikes are left on BYU campus; 3-5% of all bikes on campus during warmer months.  BYU Police has agreed to donate these bikes to Provo Bicycle Collective who will refurbish and send the bikes back on the road; giving many away and selling others at low cost.

In 2016, Bicycle Collective’s statewide operations received 5,552 donated bicycles and sent 3,089 repaired bikes back into the community, giving away 1,609 to underprivileged individuals.

With increased donations, Provo Bicycle Collective hopes to increase its output, putting hundreds more bikes on the road and encouraging Provo citizens to drive cars less.”

Provo Bike Prom a Success

On the evening of October 27th, about 80 people gathered at the Provo Bicycle Collective to ride their bikes.  However, instead of dressing in casual clothing or athletic gear, this group decked themselves out in tuxedos and gowns.  It was Prom night in Provo; Bike Prom, that is!

Bike Prom is an annual fundraising event consisting of a casual ride around town and a dance.  All proceeds go to the Bicycle Collective to be used for their charitable programs.

This year’s event featured a 5-mile ride around downtown and the pioneer neighborhoods and ended at the Startup Building were the dance was held.

 

The event drew nearly 100 participants and raised $340 dollars, enough to provide six underprivileged people with a free Goodwill Bike from Provo Bicycle Collective.

Check out all the photos here. 

Thanks to all who attended and we hope to see more people next year!