Want a Happy Ending if your Bike is Stolen?

By Norman Thurston, Utah State House District 64 Representative and bikeprovo Board Member

A year ago, I decided to stop using my car to get to work. It’s about 2 miles from my house to the FrontRunner station in Provo, then another 2 from Salt Lake Central to work. I saved up my money and invested in a nice commuter bike (Specialized Crosstrail) and added some features thanks to some suggestions from a friend in the Provo bicycling community. I registered it with Provo City at the BIke Collective. It was also registered on bikeindex.org

Here I am on Bike to Work Day, along with Lucy Ordaz, another bikeprovo board member, at UTA’s breakfast station.

At work, we have a covered bike rack right outside the front door which made it easy to lock up and get in the building.

On Sept 19, when I came out out the building to ride home, there was no bike, and the cut lock was laying on the ground. I called 911 and a patrol officer from SLC PD responded surprisingly quickly and took the report. Fortunately, the bike rack is covered by our security video system, so they were able to provide SLCPD with a close up of the person that stole it as well as video of the whole sequence of events.

Here is the video (the suspect appears at about 44 seconds):

The woman who stole it had actually come into the building, talked with the security desk to ask about using the restroom, then left the building. A minute later she was seen coming back straight to the bike rack with some kind of tool that she used to cut the lock and calmly ride away.

With the video evidence, SLCPD was able to identify the thief (Oct 17) and get the prosecutor to file charges in a few weeks. (At the moment, they are still looking for her, but are confident that she will show up sooner rather than later.)

About 2 months after it was stolen, I got a call from the detective that the bike had been located at a pawn shop in South Salt Lake. They found it there during a routine check of serial numbers in the pawn database.

The detective was very helpful in getting through the process to seize the bike and get it returned. It took about 3 weeks from the time they found it until I got it back.
It is in suprisingly good shape – someone added a kcikstand and a water bottle holder – but it does need a tune-up now.

Lessons learned:
1. Make sure you keep the receipt showing the serial number and the value. (That was very helpful to the police.)
2. Register the bike with local PD and on bikeindex
3. Get a really good lock (I had a cable lock, now I have a U-lock)
4. Don’t park in the same place every day.
5. Keep the bike inside a building if you can.

2018 Pedestrian Summit

At the Pedestrian Summit on November 29th, Provo was well-represented by  attendees (at least five) and presenters. Chad Thomas, from Economic Development, and Mary Wade from the PTA board at Timpanogos Elementary, participating in a panel discussion that followed the keynote speech of Jon Larsen, Salt Lake City’s Transportation Director.
Here are the highlights of that talk and the panel:
Jon Larsen: “It is our job to “design for stupid” because we’re all a little stupid sometimes. I hope to someday see pedestrian fatality as a thing of the past as we now view polio. The best way to make real strides toward our zero fatalities goal is this: we need to differentiate between the design for highways and the design for streets.”
Juliette Ruzzio, keynote speaker and Miss Wheelchair America 2005: “Transportation is an equalizer for people with disabilities. When we design for the most vulnerable, the transportation system works for us all.”

Chad Thomas: It’s important to be willing to say no to developers until they agree to standards we have set to keep our cities attractive and walkable. Chad also stressed the importance of leaders truly walking the talk and moving toward active transportation and transit.

Mary Wade: Nearly 100 families responded to the PTA’s survey to find out how they feel about walking or biking to Timpanogos, a walking-designated elementary school here in Provo. Regularly seeking out and responding to their voices is essential if we want to get our Safe Routes to School plans right for education, engineering, enforcement, encouragement, and evaluation. We can work toward healthier cultural norms as we positively frame our messaging for what’s possible in our neighborhoods.

Tactical Urbanism in Orem

A giant doughnut could be the key to slowing down cars in front of the Orem Fitness Center.

Painted by a group of volunteers who took to the roads by the Orem Fitness Center on Friday evening with paint and a vision to improve safety for pedestrians and cyclists, the temporary traffic calming fixtures like the pink doughnut could be used to make Orem roads safer.

Read more from the Daily Herald.

BikeProvo Instagram Update

It’s time to put our money where our mouths are. If you believe increased bike-ability will improve Provo, we need your help. We’re raising $500 to affiliate as a 501c3 nonprofit organization. This will allow us to more easily raise money to fund tactical urbanism projects and hire urbanist speakers to train city employees.
We only need $75 more dollars. Will you give for a bike-friendly Provo?

Donate today! Link in bio.

#blog via Instagram https://ift.tt/2CQQwlG

Provo Bicycle Collective Gives 90 Bikes for Bike to School Week

From Provo Bicycle Collective:

“When the school district asked us to participate in Bike to School Week this year, we went all in. Provo Bicycle Collective originally promised 75 bikes to local elementary schools, but the requests kept coming after that, until we reached 90 bikes.

Why did we promise this? Because every kid deserves a bike. Most of us remember our first bike as a child because it gave us freedom; freedom to explore at the speed of discovery. Every child deserves this feeling.

This week, most of those bikes were given out to children who didn’t already own a bike. To say they were thrilled is an understatement. I’ll let this photo do the talking from here.

If you’ve ever volunteered with us, know that you played a huge part in this. All giveaway bikes are refurbished by volunteers like you. We can’t thank you enough! See more photos of these kids here and don’t forget to share!

If you’d like to ensure all kids get a bike, regardless of family income, donate today!Just $50 gives a bike to a kid in need!”

Mayor Kaufusi Presents at Move Utah Summit

On September 26, 2018 Mayor Kaufusi sat on a panel of mayors and county comissioners that talked about their successes in promoting active transportation. Mayor Kaufusi showed this great video about UVX.

Kaufusi noted that UVX ridership has increased by 400% since BYU’s fall semester started. Over 9,000 people rode it to the BYU football game right before the summit!

She then doubled-down on her support of active transportation:

“Get people out of their cars!”

“Doubters will doubt no matter what. I love BRT!”

“I am a huge advocate for active transportation.”

The High Cost of Free Parking

Yesterday Donald Shoup (aka Shoup Dogg) came to the Salt Lake Valley to speak about our current parking issues and how we can solve them.

Shoup suggests two main things:

  1. Abolish minimum parking requirements
  2. Charge the right price for parking
He argues that if cities can do these two things, there will be enough parking where people need it; not too little where they want it and too much where it’s not needed.
See this wonderful video to learn more! If you want to get really nerdy, buy his book with the same title.