Docuseries by Provo filmmaker highlights lifelong biker

Created by Brad Barber, a longtime bike rider and university professor in Provo, UT.

What is it that ties us to the state where we currently live and adopt it as the one we’re “from”? How does living in our states define us? States of America is a series of short documentaries–one from each of our 50 states–that ask these questions by featuring everyday people as diverse as the landscape in the places they call home. This is a story of Rhode Island.

Jack is a native of Rhode Island and has called the Ocean State his home for all 82 years of his life. He is a volunteer meal deliverer for Meals on Wheels and a tour guide with the Providence Preservation Society. Jack believes that the people you spend your life with have the greatest potential to inspire you.

*States of America is created and produced by Brad Barber
*Rhode Island is directed and shot by Brad Barber, edited by Kelton Davis, with music by Micah Dahl Anderson. Title design by Brian Turley and Mark T. Lewis.

 

BYU makes steps to become more bike-friendly

Recently, BYU launched bike.byu.edu, a website that informs students, faculty, and staff of  how to stay safe and have fun while riding your bike to, from, and on campus.

The site lists suggested routes to and from campus, ways to keep your bike in good shape, and even ways to get involved in bike advocacy.

Check out the website right now!

BYU has taken a very promising step forward and we hope that it will continue to do so!

Provo Public Staff Woke to Urbanization

You’re gonna love this.

Mountainland Association of Governments held a transportation summit a few months ago at which they asked public employees their opinions on transportation issues. The central valley staff (Orem/Provo/Springville) showed that they are much more accepting of density and urbanization than those in surrounding cities.

Of note: our staff stated that they welcome toll roads, free public transit, and quickening the pace of bike lane implementation as part of future transportation improvements.

Keep this forward momentum going by following our posts and acting when invited!

Save TIGER Funding for Biking and Walking

Funding for the TIGER program–which funds biking and walking infrastructure–is being debated in congress right now. If fully funded, this program will fund project like the pedestrian bridge over 600 S in Provo that connects to UTA’s central station.

We need this money set aside for active transportation projects or else it will be swallowed up in the vast sums of money that go to highway and road widening projects.

Please take action here now!

2018 Mobile Active Transportation Tour a Success

On Tuesday, June 26, a group of interested people hopped on their bikes to join Bike Provo activists on an active transportation tour throughout the city. On the tour, we examined current biking and walking infrastructure, visualized planned infrastructure, and talked about improvements that could be made.

Thank you to all who attended! We hope to do this again next year.

Provo Bicycle Committee Member Writes Senior Thesis on Bicycle Advocacy

Hey all,

Austin Taylor here.

I’ve written something I think you all will enjoy.

This week, I graduate from BYU. Since my senior thesis is about bicycle advocacy, I thought I would share it with you all. It focuses on how the quality of our communication makes all the difference in advocacy. My paper contains thoughts from my own experience and from urbanists like Jane Jacobs, Janette Sadik-Khan, and Mikael Colville-Anderson. Because of the type of person you, as a reader of BikeProvo.org, probably are–engaged, involved, maybe even WOKE–the paper will contain strategies that you can immediately apply in your own activism.

After 193 college credits, two majors, and two minors, I’ve finally graduated. I’m surprised it only took four years. Thank you to my mentors along the way like Dr. Aaron Skabelund of the history department, Dr. Brough and Dr. Coleman of the percussion studio, and Dr. Shumway of Latin American Studies. Thanks also to my wife who has let me be a workaholic for the duration of our marriage so far.

Thanks for reading and I hope you enjoy this paper!

Benefits of the Bulldog Boulevard Improvement Project and More Info

The following are a few excerpts from the Project Concept Report, which the Regional Planning Committee used to approve $3 million of MAG funds for the project.  If the project deviates significantly from the Project Scope it will have to go back through the Technical Advisory Committee and be re-approved by the Regional Planning Committee, which consists of all the mayors and county commissioners in Utah County.  If they do not accept changes made to the project the $3 million will be allocated to the next eligible project (Springville 1200 W or Mapleton Lateral Canal Trail).

The Purpose of the Project
“The purpose of the project is to construct a raised center median to eliminate left turn movements along the Bulldog Blvd corridor which has a crash rate that is 3 times higher than the state average for roadways of similar functional class and traffic volumes.  The corridor has a severe crash rate that is 7.5 times higher than the statewide average for roadways of similar functional class and traffic volume.  The project will also eliminate one travel lane in each direction in favor of a protected bicycle lane.  There is a significant number of bicycle crashes on the corridor given the lack of adequate bicycle facilities on this important gateway into the BYU campus.  The project will provide an important bicycle/pedestrian connection from the Provo River Parkway Trail to the BYU campus.”
First Responders Access
“The project will include traffic cameras, and emergency vehicle preemption which will provide maximum benefit to emergency vehicles and traffic operations along the corridor.
Decreased Auto Crashes
The project will reduce accident severity by eliminating high occurence left turn angle crashes and by separating bikes and peds from vehicle traffic.  UDOT Traffic and Safety has evaluated the project and has determined that the project improvements have a total cost/benefit of $4.4 million dollars based on the crash reduction potential of the proposed improvements.
Decreased Congestion
By minimizing the number of driveway accesses, traffic flow along the corridor will improve.
Beautification and Noise Reduction
The project will minimize noise impacts along the corridor adding landscaping features to soften the noise.  The project also provides opportunities for landscaping and other treatments that can be incorporated into the drainage system that will improve water quality of storm runoff”

For more information, see this detailed report from Mountainlands Association of Governments

The Decision to Fund Bulldog Boulevard Improvements is Down to the Wire!

A month or two ago, we told you about the major improvements that were being planned for Bulldog Boulevard. These improvements would dramatically improve safety for a road that is seven times more deadly than average, beautify this ugly street, and, as council member Dave Sewell put it, save lives. However, those improvements may not happen without your voice.

Sadly, many residents intend to keep this street the high-speed, wide-open road is now is. This would maintain the high level of traffic crashes–more than seven times the state average–and continue to discourage cycling. These people have already blasted the city council with messaging in opposition of the project. What do they oppose? An increased car travel time of only four seconds in one direction and forty seconds in the other during peak traffic hours. That’s a small price to pay for safety.

Because of that opposition, the council is split on the decision to fund the project. Currently, three of the seven council members are opposed to the project and one is still undecided. This is too close to call.

We need your voice!

Tomorrow, the city council will be discussing this project and potentially making a decision on wether it should go through or not. Here’s what you can do:

  1. Attend the City Council Work Meeting tomorrow (Tuesday, June 19) and voice your support. We estimate the City Council will begin talking about Bulldog Boulevard at 2:20pm.
  2. Email the City Council to voice your support of the project if you cannot attend. Send your message to council@provo.org. Key talking points in support of the project include safety improvements and city beautification. If you drive a car on that road, please mention how unsafe it feels in a car currently.

Don’t wait!Your inaction could cause this project to fail. Join us in voicing your support today!