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Top 5 Situations to Avoid When Cycling

Cycling is one of the safest ways to get from A to B. Not only do you reduce your environmental footprint, but it’s also a great form of exercise. Unfortunately, even the safest cyclist could be involved in a crash.  There’s no way to prevent a careless motorist, but there are some techniques you can utilize to reduce your chances of getting involved in a crash.

Situation #1: Getting Doored

This is one of the most dangerous situations for any cyclist, as there is very little time to react quickly enough to get out of the way of the motorist, and if you do swerve out of the way of a door, you may go into oncoming traffic. How can you avoid this?

You must ride at least 4’ away from any parked cars that you think may be opening their doors. If you can touch the car’s mirror, you’re too close. Obvious culprits include a line of parked cars and taxis, but you should also be cautious around any cars parked in the middle of the street with their hazards on. It’s likely they’re stopping to pick up or drop off a passenger.

Don’t be tempted to ring your bike’s bell when approaching cars. It does nothing. If a motorist hears it (they won’t), they still won’t realize that you’re behind the car in time. Fortunately, the law is on your site: In nearly every state, motorists have an obligation to check to make sure the coast is clear before opening their car doors. If you break a bone due to their carelessness, it’ll be paid for by their insurance.

Situation #2: Busses & Trucks

This isn’t a situation per se, but it’s something to look out for.  So, what can you do to avoid an incident with a bus? Never ride to the right of busses. They often pull to the side and make stops, so it’s easy for you to be sideswiped or forced onto the sidewalk, if you’re lucky.

Trucks and busses also have the issue of blind spots: They won’t see you approaching from the side as a motorist would. Finally: It’s not like our odds are great against cars, but a mash-up between a cyclist and a truck is even worse. Give them their space and stay far behind them to stay out of their blind spot.

Situation #3: The Left Cross

This collision occurs when you’re riding straight and a car turns left at an intersection. A cyclist is significantly smaller than a car, so motorists may not be as apt to see you as they would another vehicle. There are a few ways you can make yourself more visible to motorists so they won’t turn into you:

Dress appropriately and have the required reflectors and headlights on your bicycle at the very least. You can also add reflective stickers and decals to your helmet, which you should wear at all times!

Don’t pass anyone on the right. If you’re to the right of a car, another vehicle turning left will have no hope of seeing you.

Situation #4: Pedestrians

Much like trucks or busses, this is not a “situation,” itself, but pedestrians can cause a lot of trouble, especially if you live in a busy city. My commute home from work involves passing around 5,000 people, all trying to get to the major train station in the city. Pedestrians will peek out around a parked car, see there’s no other cars approaching, and step directly in front of me.

You should ride in the center of your lane whenever you’re in an area with heavy foot traffic. This way, if they “peek out” in front of cars, you won’t crash into them. If you do see someone stroll in front of you: Bells are a solid idea, and investing in a loud bell (such as a SpurCycle) may help you get your point across.

Situation #5: Potholes and Loose Gravel

As dangerous as motorists are, many crashes are caused by poor terrain or simply falling off your bike. Be sure to take note of your environment as you ride, which includes the ground as well as the other cars. Only ride roads you know well at night if you can, as it’ll be much harder to navigate. Finally, and it seems obvious, but you should only ride at a speed that’s safe for your ability. It’s possible to stay loose and ride through a monster pothole, but only if you’re riding at a safe speed.

A wealth of information, tips, and videos related to Smart Cycling can be found on the Ride Smart page on the League of American Bicyclists’ website.

 

This article was provided by www.personalinjury-law.com, an organization dedicated to providing the public with information about personal injury and safety information. Nothing in this article should be construed as legal advice, and it is intended for informational use only. Be sure to review your local cycling ordinances to ensure you ride safe and legally.

UDOT Opens Active Transportation Safety Manager Position

From Bike Utah:

“UDOT recently opened this position that is primarily focused on Safe Routes to School, SNAP, and bicycle and pedestrian safety. If you know of anyone who would be a great fit for this position, please send it along to them. This is one of only four statewide people in Utah focused on AT so a great person in this position would be a huge help in moving things forward more quickly. Please share the posting. Deadline is January 3rd.”

Check out the description and apply here.

BYU Police Form Partnership with Provo Bicycle Collective

From BicycleCollective.org:

“Provo Bicycle Collective is proud to announce a newly-formed partnership with BYU police who will now donate bikes abandoned on BYU campus.  BYU Police joins Provo and Springville police departments in donating abandoned bikes to charity.

Each semester, between 200-300 bikes are bikes are left on BYU campus; 3-5% of all bikes on campus during warmer months.  BYU Police has agreed to donate these bikes to Provo Bicycle Collective who will refurbish and send the bikes back on the road; giving many away and selling others at low cost.

In 2016, Bicycle Collective’s statewide operations received 5,552 donated bicycles and sent 3,089 repaired bikes back into the community, giving away 1,609 to underprivileged individuals.

With increased donations, Provo Bicycle Collective hopes to increase its output, putting hundreds more bikes on the road and encouraging Provo citizens to drive cars less.”

Provo Bike Prom a Success

On the evening of October 27th, about 80 people gathered at the Provo Bicycle Collective to ride their bikes.  However, instead of dressing in casual clothing or athletic gear, this group decked themselves out in tuxedos and gowns.  It was Prom night in Provo; Bike Prom, that is!

Bike Prom is an annual fundraising event consisting of a casual ride around town and a dance.  All proceeds go to the Bicycle Collective to be used for their charitable programs.

This year’s event featured a 5-mile ride around downtown and the pioneer neighborhoods and ended at the Startup Building were the dance was held.

 

The event drew nearly 100 participants and raised $340 dollars, enough to provide six underprivileged people with a free Goodwill Bike from Provo Bicycle Collective.

Check out all the photos here. 

Thanks to all who attended and we hope to see more people next year!

Provo Bicycle Collective Forms Partnership With Local LDS Service Agencies

From Bicyclecollective.org:

 

“Provo Bicycle Collective is proud to announce  newly-formed partnerships with Deseret Industries, LDS Employment Center, and BYU English Language Center through which we hope to provide dozens of free bikes to people in need each year.

Our partnership allows Deseret Industries to recommend their associates and welfare clients to our shop for a free Goodwill Bike – donated bicycles refurbished by PBC volunteers. In 2016, Bicycle Collective gave away 1,436 Goodwill Bikes.

About Deseret Industries and LDS Employment Center:

Deseret Industries is a nonprofit thrift store and donation center that is

devoted to training and educating individuals to prepare them for the

workforce. In 2016, they served 15,597 hired associates and gave away

nearly 7 million pounds of clothing and shoes in humanitarian aid

About BYU English Language Center:

As a lab school, the English Language Center supports BYU’s

Department of Linguistics and English Language by facilitating the

teaching, learning, and research of English as a second language.

Our hope is that their clients will use these bikes to meet daily transportation needs; riding to work, shopping for groceries, and meeting appointments.

Bicycle Collective is always in need of money and bike donations and willing volunteers to repair bikes for giveaway. Interested donors and volunteers can find out how to get involved Bicyclecollective.org.”

Provo Bicycle Collective Forms New Partnership

From BicycleCollective.org:

“Provo Bicycle Collective is proud to announce a newly-formed partnership with Utah Community and Refugee Partnership Center (UCRPC), through which we hope to provide dozens of free bikes to refugees each year.

UCRPC is non-profit organization that is devoted to motivate, empower, enlighten and transform refugees’ life through education.  Their mission is to provide the education, orientation and support refugees need to become self-sufficient members of society.

Our partnership allows UCRCP to recommend their clients to our shop for a free Goodwill Bike – donated bicycles refurbished by PBC volunteers.  In 2016, Bicycle Collective gave away 1,436 Goodwill Bikes.

Our hope is that their clients will use these bikes to meet daily transportation needs; riding to work, shopping for groceries, and meeting appointments.

Bicycle Collective is always in need of money and bike donations and willing volunteers to repair bikes for giveaway.  Interested donors and volunteers can find out how to get involved Bicyclecollective.org.”

Provo Bicycle Collective Gives Away 31 Bikes for Bike to School Week

From Provo Bicycle Collective:

“Provo Bicycle Collective is proud to announce its gift of 27 bikes to Timpanogos Elementary, 2 bikes to Dixon Middle and 2 bikes to Provo High during Provo’s Bike to School week.  Our hope is that these bikes will be given to children who could not otherwise afford one so they too can ride their bikes to school.

These bikes came to Provo Bicycle Collective donated, were refurbished by volunteers, and safety checked by our trained mechanics.  We are always looking for worthy organizations to give bikes to and interested volunteers to fix bikes with us.  Contact provo@bicyclecollective.org with any questions.”


Provo Bicycle Collective named Provo’s only Gold-level Bicycle Friendly Business

Today, the League of American Bicyclists recognized Provo Bicycle Collective with a Gold Bicycle Friendly BusinessSM (BFBSM) award, joining nearly 1,400 visionary businesses across the country.
With the announcement of 60 new and renewing BFBs today, Provo Bicycle Collective joins a cutting-edge group of 1,367 local businesses, government agencies, and Fortune 500 companies in all 50 states and Washington, DC, that are transforming the American workplace.

“The League of American Bicyclists is excited to recognize this latest group of new and renewing Bicycle Friendly Businesses for making their workplaces and their communities safer, happier, healthier, and more sustainable through bicycling,” said Amelia Neptune, Director of the Bicycle Friendly America program. “We applaud these businesses, including Provo Bicycle Collective, for leading the charge in creating a more bicycle-friendly America for everyone.”

Encouraging employees to ride their bikes to work has boosted productivity by ensuring that each staff member arrives fully awake, energized, and ready for the day. Provo Bicycle Collective encourages bicycling as an easy option for transportation and provides amenities such as indoor bike parking and incentives such as access to employee pricing on bike goods for employees.

Moving forward, Provo Bicycle Collective will have access to a variety of tools and technical assistance from the League to become even more bicycle-friendly. When our employees bike, great things happen: the need for onsite parking decreases, productivity increases, and our carbon footprint greatly decreases.

To apply or learn more about the BFB program, visit the League online at www.bikeleague.org/business.

About the Bicycle Friendly America Program

To learn more about building a Bicycle Friendly America, including the Bicycle Friendly CommunitySM, Bicycle Friendly StateSM, Bicycle Friendly Business, and Bicycle Friendly UniversitySM programs.visit www.bikeleague.org/BFA.
The League of American Bicyclists is leading the movement to create a Bicycle Friendly America for everyone. As leaders, our commitment is to listen and learn, define standards and share best practices to engage diverse communities and build a powerful, unified voice for change.

Provo Police Department Awarded Golden Spoke Bicycle Commuter Award

Each year, Provo Bicycle Committee chooses a dedicated commuter cyclist to give the Golden Spoke award to.  This year, we decided to honor those who keep the streets safe; Provo Police Department’s Bike Patrol Team.  The presentation was made during the Provo City Council meeting on August 29, 2017.  It starts at around 20:00 in the video below: